Thursday, June 1, 2017

June and July Events at The Goshen Fairgrounds

June 4-5 
Chamber of Commerce
June 11 
FFA Garden Tractor Pull / Horse Show
June 14 
Rhon Jennings Antique Show
June 17-19 
 
July 9 
Little Guild Pet Adoption
July 16-17 
Tibet Fest
July 25-26 
July 30-31 
 
August 6-7 
August 21 
Litchfield Hills Historical Auto Club Show

Monday, May 1, 2017

May and June Events at the Goshen Fairgrounds

May 14 
4H Showmanship
May 21 
Southern Berkshire Amateur Radio Club
May 28-30 
CT Family Campers & RV’ers
 
 
June 4-5 
Chamber of Commerce
June 11 
FFA Garden Tractor Pull / Horse Show
June 14 
Rhon Jennings Antique Show
June 17-19 

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

How to Get the Most out of your Air Conditioner..

From The Art of Doing Stuff



  • Wash your outdoor unit with high pressure hose water working from the top down.  It’s like cleaning out the lint trap on your dryer.  If the air conditioning unit is clogged it can’t work properly.

  • Make sure none of your vents are blocked.  Not blocked by a couch, dresser, sleeping goat.  Nothin’.

  • If you don’t use your basement or it’s getting too cold, close your basement vents.  Since cold air drops, basements always get cold.  Closing the vents will  force cold air to other areas of the house where the cool is needed more.

  • In the spring or fall when you don’t need air conditioning but still want to cool the house a little, turn your furnace fan on.  This will circulate the air throughout the house making it feel cooler.

  • If one vent is blowing really strongly it’s taking power away from vents elsewhere.  Close the offending vent a little to allow airflow elsewhere.  In older houses this can be done with the dampers in the basement.

  • Don’t ever turn your air conditioner off in the summer.  Once it’s cool enough outside, turn the temperature that your air is supposed to come on  up a few degrees and open your windows.   When your air comes on you know it’s time to close your windows again.  If you let your house overheat in the summer getting full of hot air and humidity before you turn the air on, it’s harder on the air conditioner, more expensive and takes wayyyyy longer to cool the house down.

  • Finally, if you can’t seem to get your house consistently cold or your upstairs is still too hot, call in a professional.  Having your system professionally balanced makes a huge difference and could mean the difference between a good night’s sleep and punching your partner in the head because you woke up drowning in their puddle of sweat.

Monday, April 3, 2017

Events at the Goshen Fairgrouns for this April and May

2016 Off-Season Fair Grounds Schedule
   
April 22-24 
Litchfield County Conservation District Seedling
  Tree Sale
   
May 14 
4H Showmanship
May 21 
Southern Berkshire Amateur Radio Club
May 28-30 
CT Family Campers & RV’ers
   
June 4-5 
Chamber of Commerce
June 11 
FFA Garden Tractor Pull / Horse Show
June 14 
Rhon Jennings Antique Show
June 17-19 
Goshen Stampede
 
July 9 
Little Guild Pet Adoption
July 16-17 
Tibet Fest
July 25-26 
CT Wine Festival
July 30-31 
Litchfield County 4-H Fair
 
August 6-7 
Litchfield Jazz Festival
August 21 
Litchfield Hills Historical Auto Club Show

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Some Upcoming Local Events







Spring Tag Sale-9am-4pm-Lourdes in Litchfield

Tai Chi-12:30-1:30pm-Litchfield Community Center

 

Spring Tag Sale-9am-4pm-Lourdes in Litchfield
Veteran of the Month Ceremony-10am-Bantam Borough Hall
CT DEEP CARE Fresh Water Fishing Class-10am-3pm-WMCC
Art Opening: Avian Photography, Nick Hawvermale-4-5pm-WMCC
 
Spring Tag Sale-9am-4pm-Lourdes in Litchfield
Lenten Sacred Choral Music and Readings-4pm-St. Michael’s
 
Live Well Workshop-12:30-3pm-Litchfield Community Center
 
VNA Northwest Blood Pressure Check-11:45am-Warren Town Hall
Book Discussion: 14th Amendment-5:30-6:30pm-Litch. Hist. Mus.
Ecumenical Lenten Soup Supper-6-8pm-St. Paul's, Bantam
 
Young Historians Book Club-3:30-5pm-Litchfield Hist. Soc.
 
Goshen Garden Club Luncheon-12pm-Goshen Church of Christ
Women's Forum: An Artist's Story-2:30pm-Litchfield CC
Thru Hiking the Appalachian Trail-7-8pm-Oliver Wolcott Library
 

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Northwest Conservation District Plant Sale

Pre-order by April 7th

NOW OPEN to order onlineOrder Deadline is April 7, 2017.See you at the Goshen Fairgrounds! 
 
Go to the web site for an order form
 

 

Pick up Information

Pick-up hours are:
Friday, April 21: 9am - 6pm
Saturday, April 22: 9am - 4pm
Sunday, April 23: 10am - 3pm
Pick up your order at Goshen Fairgrounds, 116 Old Middle Street, Goshen, CT.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Goshen Players Upcoming Schedule

First Date

book by Austin Winsberg and music and lyrics by Alan Zachary and Michael Weiner


March 31 - April 9, 2017
March 31, April 1, 7, & 8, 2017 at 8:00 PM
April 2 & 9, 2017 at 3:00 PM

Aaron is a "blind date virgin," while Casey has been on more than her fair share. When the two are set up by a mutual friend, sparks fly—or do they? The night unfolds over the course of this couple's hilarious first date, and it's not without its share of surprises in the form of imaginary visits from Aaron's ex-girlfriend, Casey's uptight sister, the pair's protective parents and even their future son! Google background checks, awkward pauses and bailouts are all there during this unforgettable first encounter between two romantics, who just might be perfect for each other. Or not.


www.goshenplayers.org for tickets and more

This Weeks Cleaning Tip

u have an abundance of stainless steel appliances in your home, you know that it can get streaky, cloudy, and fingerprint-y very easily. While stainless is less prone to corrosion than other materials (and super trendy), it does take a bit of effort to keep it looking handsome.

Here's what you need to know about cleaning and maintaining your beloved stainless steel surfaces.

1. Always wipe in the direction of the grain.


Stainless steel has a wood-like grain to it. Look closely at your appliance or countertop and you'll see some faint lines running along the finish. See them? That's the direction you'll want to follow. If you don't, it'll be a lot easier for dirt and cleaning chemicals to build up within the tiny cracks of the grain over time, decreasing the shine and overall beauty of the material. And you don't want that!

2. You can avoid scratches by using a microfiber cloth.


Stainless surfaces can become scratched and then they're less pretty. Wipe them down with microfiber cloths, which have short, fine fibers and won't mess up the finish. You may be tempted to use a paper towel. Don't! A microfiber cloth is softer and always the way to go here.

Related: The One Cleaning Tool You Really Need in Your Kitchen

3. Cleaning stainless steel is really a two-step process.

From Apartment Therapy

We hate telling you that you have to clean anything twice, but you really do have to wipe down your stainless steel two times in a row if you're doing a deep clean — once with vinegar to remove dirt, and then with mineral or olive oil to add shine. First, spray vinegar directly onto the appliance, then wipe it off using a microfiber cloth in the direction of the grain. Next, polish the surface with a few drops of oil on a second cloth, again in the direction of the grain.

Do this once a week or whenever you start to notice a lot of water marks, streaks, fingerprints, or general flatness in the finish.

Related: How To Clean Stainless Steel Appliances with Vinegar and Oil

4. Daily maintenance is a lot easier.


For regular, daily cleaning, simply use water and soap (or dish detergent) along with a microfiber cloth. Be sure to dry the area — with a second cloth — after wiping to avoid water spots and the minor corrosive effects of the minerals in the water.

5. You don't really need to buy a special cleaner.


Between the soap-and-water combo and the vinegar-and-oil wipes, you don't really need much more than that. The only reason you might want to consider getting a special stainless steel cleaner or polish? If you start to notice any small scratches.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

How To Light a Fire In Your Fireplace

From the Art of Manliness

One of my favorite things about winter is spending time next to a warm and cozy fireplace fire. What’s more romantic than snuggling up to your gal in front of a glowing fire? And what’s more relaxing than coming home from a long day of work, sitting in your man chair, and unwinding next to a glowing hearth?

If you’ve never started a fire in a fireplace (and no, those automatic electric fireplace don’t count), then this guide is for you.

1. Make sure your chimney is clean and free of blockages. It’s always a good idea to get your chimney swept before you start lighting fires in it. Even if you haven’t used it, animal nests and old leaves can cause blockages that will result in a smoke-filled house. Call a chimney sweep to come check out your chimney. Of course, you should have done this already when you winterized your house.

2. Open the damper. I made the mistake of not opening the damper the first time I made a fire in a fireplace. The heater had gone out in our house, and we were in the middle of an ice storm. I tried being the big hero by starting up a cozy fire in the fireplace. I got the fire going, but it filled the entire house with smoke. Don’t be like me. Make sure to open the damper all the way if you want to avoid keeling over from smoke inhalation.

3. Prime the flue. If your chimney is built on the outside of your house, the chimney flue is probably cold. When you open the damper, the cold air in the flue will sink and come into your warm house. If you try to light a fire during this air sink, you’re going to end up with smoke coming into the house instead of up the chimney. To counteract the air sink, you need to prime the flue by warming it up. This is done by lighting a roll of newspaper and holding it up the damper opening for a few minutes. When you feel the draft reverse, you know the flue is primed, and you’re ready to start your fire. If you have a fireplace that has a gas pipe to supplement your wood burning, turn on the gas and light the pilot light without any wood in the fireplace. Your flue will warm up in a matter of minutes.

4. Develop an ash bed. Having a 1- 2 inch ash bed in your fireplace hearth will help insulate the fireplace and create hotter fires. If you’ve never built a fire in your fireplace before, this can be a problem. One quick fix is to take the ashes from your outdoor grill and place them in your fireplace to build the ash bed. While a small ash bed is good, too much ash is a bad thing. Make sure to clean the ashes out of your fireplace from time to time.

5. Build an “upside down” fire. Several fire-building methods exist, and all of them have their merits. If there’s a particular way you like to build a fire, by all means do it. But if you’re looking to build a clean burning fire that lasts for hours, try using the “upside down” fire lay.

Unlike traditional fire lays that require you to put tinder and smaller kindling at the bottom and larger fuel logs on the top, the upside down fire lay reverses the sequence. Start off by stacking your large fuel logs on the bottom of the fire grate. Stack smaller logs on top. Add a kindling layer (small twigs about the size of your pinky) on top of the stack. Top off the stack with bunched up newspaper balls and other tinder. Light the fire from the top. Because smoke won’t have to pass through the cold logs, the fire will burn cleaner. What’s nice about this arrangement, too, is that you don’t have to do much to keep it going.

One of my favorite things about winter is spending time next to a warm and cozy fireplace fire. What’s more romantic than snuggling up to your gal in front of a glowing fire? And what’s more relaxing than coming home from a long day of work, sitting in your man chair, and unwinding next to a glowing hearth?
If you’ve never started a fire in a fireplace (and no, those automatic electric fireplace don’t count), then this guide is for you.
1. Make sure your chimney is clean and free of blockages. It’s always a good idea to get your chimney swept before you start lighting fires in it. Even if you haven’t used it, animal nests and old leaves can cause blockages that will result in a smoke-filled house. Call a chimney sweep to come check out your chimney. Of course, you should have done this already when you winterized your house.
2. Open the damper. I made the mistake of not opening the damper the first time I made a fire in a fireplace. The heater had gone out in our house, and we were in the middle of an ice storm. I tried being the big hero by starting up a cozy fire in the fireplace. I got the fire going, but it filled the entire house with smoke. Don’t be like me. Make sure to open the damper all the way if you want to avoid keeling over from smoke inhalation.
3. Prime the flue. If your chimney is built on the outside of your house, the chimney flue is probably cold. When you open the damper, the cold air in the flue will sink and come into your warm house. If you try to light a fire during this air sink, you’re going to end up with smoke coming into the house instead of up the chimney. To counteract the air sink, you need to prime the flue by warming it up. This is done by lighting a roll of newspaper and holding it up the damper opening for a few minutes. When you feel the draft reverse, you know the flue is primed, and you’re ready to start your fire. If you have a fireplace that has a gas pipe to supplement your wood burning, turn on the gas and light the pilot light without any wood in the fireplace. Your flue will warm up in a matter of minutes.
4. Develop an ash bed. Having a 1- 2 inch ash bed in your fireplace hearth will help insulate the fireplace and create hotter fires. If you’ve never built a fire in your fireplace before, this can be a problem. One quick fix is to take the ashes from your outdoor grill and place them in your fireplace to build the ash bed. While a small ash bed is good, too much ash is a bad thing. Make sure to clean the ashes out of your fireplace from time to time.
5. Build an “upside down” fire. Several fire-building methods exist, and all of them have their merits. If there’s a particular way you like to build a fire, by all means do it. But if you’re looking to build a clean burning fire that lasts for hours, try using the “upside down” fire lay.
Unlike traditional fire lays that require you to put tinder and smaller kindling at the bottom and larger fuel logs on the top, the upside down fire lay reverses the sequence. Start off by stacking your large fuel logs on the bottom of the fire grate. Stack smaller logs on top. Add a kindling layer (small twigs about the size of your pinky) on top of the stack. Top off the stack with bunched up newspaper balls and other tinder. Light the fire from the top. Because smoke won’t have to pass through the cold logs, the fire will burn cleaner. What’s nice about this arrangement, too, is that you don’t have to do much to keep it going.

With your cozy fireplace lit, it’s time to pick out a good book, make some hot chocolate, sink down into your leather man chair, and bask in the glow of the blazing hearth.


With your cozy fireplace lit, it’s time to pick out a good book, make some hot chocolate, sink down into your leather man chair, and bask in the glow of the blazing hearth.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Some Upcoming Local Events




Alzheimer's Support Group-12pm-Brandycare, Litchfield
Book Talk: Looking for the Stranger-7-8pm-Oliver Wolcott Library

 



Drive-In Movie (ages 2-5)-10:30am-12:30pm-Oliver Wolcott Library

Friday Feast and Dancing Feet-12-2pm-Litchfield Community Center

Listening to Contemplative Voices in Nature-6pm-Wisdom House

DJ Dance (Gr. 7-8)-7-9:30pm-Litchfield Community Center

 


Science Saturdays-10-11am-Litchfield Community Center
LH Farm-Fresh Indoor Market-10am-1pm-Litchfield CC
World According to Gerri-2pm-White Memorial CC
Nurturing Our Spiritual Connection to the Natural World-3pm-WMCC
Art Gallery Opening: Sacred Moments-3-5pm-Wisdom House
Goshen Country Dance Night-7:30-11:30pm-Camp Coch, Goshen

 


Shorebirding for Waterfowl-8:30am-LH Audubon Society
Agatha Christie Book Discussion-1-2pm-Oliver Wolcott Library